Sunday, April 13, 2014

A little bit of fun

Whatever it is that my readers look for in my posts, I think everybody will agree that it is not humour. Not the easy-breezy brings-a-smile-on-your-lips kind anyway. And yet, those who know me intimately will sometimes associate me with the crazy class clown! After all, there is nothing like an occasional dose of  funny madness to lighten up your mood, right?

After going through a particularly stressful day, I sat back in my chair an hour ago to look through the day's newspaper. After finishing with the important stuff, I took out the daily pull-out called Metro to glance through it. And I found this.

It is aimed at Bengalis who will relate to it the most, but all my readers can take a look at it. It is nothing great, I warn you. Do not expect anything refined and high-brow. But it gave me a much needed laugh, and I definitely feel the better for it. Maybe I will go and enjoy some lyadh after a dose of Gelusil now! Enjoy :)

7 comments:

Suvro Chatterjee said...

A big thumbs up, ma. :)

baba

Urbi Chatterjee said...

Thank you baba. I wasn't sure how much you will like it, so this makes me happy :)

Sriranjani said...

I seriously had a good laugh, Pupu. Thank you for this one :D

Sriranjani di

Arnab Roy said...

A really funny one indeed. Sharing a similar one here which is worth a laugh.

Arnab

http://www.scoopwhoop.com/inothernews/38-reasons-why-growing-up-bong-was-the-best-thing-ever/

Urbi Chatterjee said...

Dear Arnab da,

I have seen this one before and never used it for a similar blogpost because I personally don't agree with many of them. But anyway, thanks for sharing.

Pupu

Ankita Sarkar said...

I loved that article when I read it in print and loved being reminded of it just now. My favourites, of course, are iye and nyaka because they can't be translated.

Forever Bangali,
A.S.

DEBANIK said...


In 1984/'85,
my school Principal, an Anglo-Indian gentleman, had to explain the word
"coy"
to a classmate of mine (who was week in the language)


This was a little challenging. He scratched his bald pate
and said
"Umm, Bengalees have a good word for it - nyaka".


The Telegraph may well draw a blank
but Suvro may think of a better translation for the untranslatable
(nyaka).
I have followed his link here.


God bless you betoo